fbpx
Connect with us

News

Trudeau says spreading pipeline blockades a ‘concern’

mm

Published

on

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau took time from his African jaunt Wednesday to tell reporters the growing lawless protests in Canada over the building of the Global GasLink pipeline are “concerning.”

Road blocks, train blockades, port, buildings and bridge shutdowns have been growing across Canada since last Thursday when the RCMP raided and tore down an Indigenous camp near Smithers.

“Obviously it’s extremely important to respect the right to freely demonstrate peacefully, but we need to make sure the laws are respected. That’s why I’m going to be engaging with our ministers and looking at what possible next steps there are,” Trudeau told reporters in Senegal.

Trudeau said he would be talking to cabinet ministers later Wednesday.

• EDITORIAL: What the Western Standard is saying about the protests.

“I am encouraging all parties to dialogue, to resolve this as quickly as possible,” said Trudeau.

On Tuesday, CN Rail said it would be forced to shut down large swaths of track if the protests continue. It said Canada’s international reputation as a supplier was being damaged.

Illegal roadblocks in Vancouver (source: CBC)

And VIA Rail has now cancelled dozens of trips in high traffic areas of Eastern Canada. They have cancelled all trips through Thursday.

The Prince George Citizen said the RCMP had found a bridge damaged near the standoff site.

RCMP said officers noticed on Friday the support beams had been cut and some bolts loosened on Lamprey Creek Bridge, making it unsafe to support any kind of traffic. By Saturday, repairs had been complete, and a criminal investigation launched, RCMP said.

The pipeline has the support of all First Nations along the route, but hereditary chiefs of Wet’suwet’en Nation, through which 28% of the 670-km route passes, oppose it.

A group of unelected hereditary chiefs had set up a camp near Smithers and have kicked out Coastal GasLink workers.

Courtesy Twitter

The RCMP said they have found traps like felled trees and three stacks of tires along with flammables along the access road.

On Jan. 7, 2019, RCMP arrested 14 protesters along the B.C. logging road. 

International attention was drawn to the issue when a British newspaper reported RCMP were ready to shoot protesters when they broke up the camp. The RCMP denied the story.

On Dec. 31, the B.C. Supreme Court granted CGL an injunction against members of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation from blocking the pipeline route near Smithers, B.C.

But the situation has been further complicated after a Jan. 3 indict by the Unist’ot’en, a smaller group within the First Nation, that they intend to terminate an agreement that had granted the company access to the land.

The RCMP checkpoint had been set up at the 27-km mark of the forest service road “to mitigate safety concerns related to the hazardous items of fallen trees and tire piles with incendiary fluids along the roadway.”

The $6.6 billion pipeline, to be operated by TC Energy Corp, would transport gas from near Dawson Creek in northeast B.C. to Kitimat on the coast and supply Canada’s largest liquefied natural gas export terminal, called LNG Canada, which is under construction.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

Twitter: @Nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

News

Edmonton homeless protesters vow to stay until changes made

Security is handled by The Crazy Indian Brotherhood, some who are former gang members looking to better themselves.

mm

Published

on

A group of Edmonton protesters have set up their own version of Seattle’s CHAZ – and vow not to move until their demands are met.

At last count, 172 tents have sprung up in the Edmonton neighbourhood of Rossdale, frustrating both community residents and police.

Edmonton city administrations said currently about 300 people live there permanently.

The group, there since July 24, has demanded $39 million be taken out of the Edmonton Police Service budget, and end to police violence against the homeless and free transit for everyone.

But in an Edmonton council meeting Thursday, administration said “we are not negotiating on any of their demands.

The camp came about after the province decided to stop pandemic work with the homeless at the EXPO and Kinsmen centres, displacing many of the homeless.

Residents have named their camp Pekiwewin meaning “coming home” in Cree.

The area is reminiscent of the Capital Hill Autonomous Zone in Seattle where hundreds of residents took over a six sq. block area following rioting after the death of black man George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer in Minneapolis.

CHAZ was lawless for weeks and saw two homicides before police finally moved in to reclaim the area.

A sign on the Pekiwewin camp entrance reads: “This is neutral territory. Any violence and you will be asked to leave.”

They have a kitchen and a medical tent that also supplies safe injection materials.

Security is handled by The Crazy Indian Brotherhood, some who are former gang members looking to better themselves.

On July 31, organizers called 911 after a trans, two-spirit member of the camp was assaulted and left with life-threatening injuries

City officials are helping with garbage pick-up and portable toilets.

But tensions do seem to be rising as many neighbours have hired their own private security guards who patrol the area. Passing motorists have thrown bottles into the camp.

The area for hundreds of years has served as an Aboriginal burial ground.

Opponents to the camp have argued homeless shelters in the city have more than enough capacity to handle all the residents.

Administration has said staff will allow the camp to stay open, provided there are no COVID-19 outbreaks, violent incidents or weather emergencies.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Continue Reading

News

Tories to try and stop Trudeau’s pay as PM’s vacay days climb

PM has already taken 48 holiday in 2020. In 2019 he took 91.

mm

Published

on

After taking 48 holiday days already in 2020, the Tories will try and stop Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s pay until he shows back up for work.

It comes after 2019, when Trudeau took a whopping 91 days off.

“Parliament should suspend Trudeau’s pay until he comes to work. I introduced a motion to that effect at Finance Committee (Thursday). The chair tried to shut it down. I will bring it back,” said Tory MP Pierre Pollievre.

Tofino

“Whereas his absence meant he could not answer questions about his $500 million grant to a group that had paid his family more than $500,000 in fees and expenses,” Pollievre’s motion read.

“Whereas the Prime Minister has taken off 20 days in six weeks – meaning half the calendar days have been days off.

“The House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance calls on the government to suspend the Prime Minister’s pay until he returns to work and takes questions in Parliament.”

Costa Rica and Vancouver, Whistler and Tofino seem to be the favourite vation spots for Trudeua.

This week, Brian Lilley of the Toronto Sun reported RCMP boats had been spotted in the waters off Pointe au Baril, in Ontario cottage country.

The PMO finally confirmed Trudeau was staying with friends in the area.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Continue Reading

News

Liberals will turn to private sector to organize gun confiscation program

A Canadian firearms expert said the buying back of now-prohibited firearms could end up costing up to $5-billion.

mm

Published

on

Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government is looking for a private organization to come up with ideas how their gun confiscation program will work after banning more than 1,500 “assault-style weapons.”

Public Safety Canada has invited 15 consulting firms to come up with a range of options and approaches for the planned program to compensate gun owners.

It’s expected any plan will cost taxpayers billions of dollars.

A spokeswoman for Public Safety Canada said options that emerge from the selected contractor “may be incorporated into a final program. Costs will be available once a provider is selected.”

Pubic Safety said any plan would would require the successful bidder to consult with other federal agencies, possibly other levels of government and industry experts to devise options that include compensation plans for each affected firearm, analysis of benefits and risks associated with each compensation model and the identification of “other considerations” that might affect the feasibility of each approach.

The first phase of the work is expected to be complete by the end of March. 

The invited bidders include well-known firms such as Deloitte, IBM Canada, KPMG and Pricewaterhouse Coopers, though Public Safety has not ruled out other entries.

Trudeau’s Liberal government announced in May they are banning 1,500 different makes and models of what he called “military-style” and “assault-style” guns in Canada.

The ban comes into effect immediately and was ordered by the cabinet without any bill or debate in Parliament.

In response to the federal order, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said the province will look at appointing its own firearms officer.

A Canadian firearms expert said the Trudeau Liberal government’s plan to buy buy recently prohibited firearms from Canadian gun owners could end up costing up to $5-billion.

Gary Mauser, Senior Fellow at the Fraser Institute, said whatever plan the Liberals come up with will likely end up being a billion-dollar boondoggle.

“Minister (Bill) Blair claimed the cost for the “buy back” of roughly 250,000 firearms would be between $400 million and $600 million—$375 million for the guns and presumably the rest for overhead. That is, if owners comply,” Mauser wrote in a January blog, published before the firearms ban was announced.

“However, the actual full cost of the ‘buy back’ won’t be $600 million; it will be much more.

“Focusing on reimbursement costs is misleading because it ignores the biggest expense—staffing costs. Prohibiting and confiscating an estimated 250,000 firearms is a complex undertaking and would involve considerable government resources. It’s impossible to do with current police resources.”

Gary Mauser

Mauser wrote that if everything went according to plan for setting up the infrastructure to buy back weapons could be up to $2.7 billion.

“Based on these assumptions, confiscating 250,000 firearms would cost the Canadian taxpayer between $1.6 billion to almost $5 billion in the first year. This estimate excludes travel costs and any ministerial administrators,” he wrote.

“Remember, this is just part of the costs to taxpayers for the “buy back.” These estimates do not include the $600 million the government promises to pay owners who surrender their firearms.”

Numerous lawsuits have been filed to try and stop the gun grab.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Continue Reading

Sign up for the Western Standard Newsletter

Free news and updates
* = required field

Trending

Copyright © Western Standard owned by Wildrose Media Corp.