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Milk being thrown down the drain across the country, despite shortages

“In its 55-year history, Dairy Farmers of Ontario has only once before had to ask producers to dispose of raw milk,” said Cheryl Smith.

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It’s a sad scene – being repeated on dairy farms daily across Canada – perfectly good milk being thrown out.

It a damning condemnation of Canada’s milk supply management system which favours dairy producers in Quebec over those in the rest of the country. Also hurting the industry is the demand falling off from restaurants and coffee shops which are closed because of the coronavirus crisis.

“With the recent COVID-19 pandemic, we had to dispose of 12,000 litres of milk in the last few days…and I can just let you know it was really hard, really heartbreaking for me,” Michael Haak, whose Enderby farm has been in his family for four generations, told CTV.

Roughly 60,000 litres of milk is being dumped in B.C. daily.

The dairy association has donated about 40,000 litres of milk to food banks .

The BC Dairy Association’s Jeremy Dunn said there are huge challenges for the dairy supply chain right across Canada.

“Retail business in this COVID (pandemic) early on was very high. It quickly fell off. Food service business has gone to almost zero,” Dunn told CTV.

“It’s not a good feeling. [This is] something that I’ve worked hard for — and all my hard work is going down the drain,” Remko Steen, a dairy farmer from Tillsonburg, Ont., told CBC.

Last week, Steen said he was forced to dump about 12,000 litres of perfectly good milk down the drain.

“In its 55-year history, Dairy Farmers of Ontario has only once before had to ask producers to dispose of raw milk,” Cheryl Smith, the association’s CEO, told BBC.

Dairy Farmers of Newfoundland and Labrador, another provincial dairy association, asked farmers to dump 170,000 litres last week. The province produces about 50 million litres a year.

“A cow produces a certain amount of milk per day and farmers must continue to milk them to keep them comfortable and well,” said the DFC website.

The website said the dairy industry employees over 23,000 Canadians and contributes $17.3 billion to the economy.

Dairy production in the country is controlled under a system known as supply management.

It has been a controversial system for years, and in the Canada-U.S.-Mexico free trade talks, U.S. President Donald Trump called on Canada to end the practice for dairy.

Canada adopted this model in the early 1970s to overcome production surpluses, according to the Dairy Farmers of Canada website. Egg and poultry farmers started to operate under the system in later years.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

Twitter: Nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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Bigots deface French signs in historic Calgary neighbourhood

Located in the community of Rouleauville, also known as Mission, the stop signs also contained the French word ‘Arret’, French for halt.

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Bilingual signs in a historic Calgary neighbourhood have been defaced, with French words being spray-painted out.

Located in the community of Rouleauville, now known as Mission, the stop signs also contained the French word ‘Arret’, French for halt.

But vandals have recently gone through the community with black spray-paint and covered up the French part.

“Oh look: Calgary’s bigots have been busy -erasing one tiny French word. Come on guys, we’re a better city than this! #frab ⁦@cityofcalgary⁩ ⁦@nenshi,” Sheila Risbud tweeted.

Defaced signs

Leela Sharon Aheer, Alberta’s Minister of Culture, Multiculturalism and Status of Women, responded with disgust.

“These actions have no place in our province and must be condemned. Our government values the role of Franco-Albertans and is committed to ensuring the French language and culture flourish in Alberta,” she tweeted.

Rouleauville, now Mission, was originally named for Charles and Edward Rouleau — brothers who moved to Calgary from Quebec in the late 1800s.

The village had been founded by French Canadian priests. 

In 1907, when the village was annexed by the Calgary its French street names were replaced with the current numbered street system.

Council voted in June to add French to the signs.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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UCP hires fired federal Tory official as new executive director

Dustin van Vugt was fired in December after the federal Conservative party’s fundraising arm (the Fund) launched an internal audit into how the party handles expenses.

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The Alberta United Conservative Party has a new executive director – the man fired over the Andrew Scheer private school controversy.

Dustin van Vugt was fired in December after the federal Conservative party’s fundraising arm (the Fund) launched an internal audit into how the party handles expenses.

van Vugt was the executive director of the Fund.

The firing came less than 24 hours after Global News reported that Conservative leader Scheer was using Fund money to send his children to private school, an arrangement van Vugt took responsibility for.

In a statement, van Vugt described the arrangement as “normal practice for political parties” and said “all proper procedures were followed and signed off on by the appropriate people.”

The seven-person board, which included former prime minister Stephen Harper, were furious over the arrangement, Global reported at the time.

Other Tories said van Vugt was being made a scapegoat.

Van Vugt replaces Brad Tennant, who left the job to become a vice-president at the lobbying firm Wellington Advocacy. 

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Biden again vows to shutdown KXL pipeline calling Alberta oil ‘tar sands’

“I’ve been against Keystone from the beginning. It is tar sands that we don’t need — that in fact is very, very high pollutant,” Joe Biden said in an interview on CNBC.

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Likely U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden trashed the Alberta oil industry Friday and again vowed to cancel the Keystone XL pipeline expansion project.

“I’ve been against Keystone from the beginning. It is tar sands that we don’t need — that in fact is very, very high pollutant,” Biden said in an interview on CNBC.

“We’re gonna transition gradually to get to a clean economy.

“But the idea of shutting down Keystone, as if that is the thing that keeps the oil industry moving, is just not rational. It does not economically, nor, in my view, environmentally, make any sense.”

Biden was repeated statements made earlier this week by a campaign official that drew the ire of Alberta Premier Jason Kenney.

Kenney noted the pipeline is part of “sensitive” Canada-U.S. relations and he would “hate to see thousands of miles of pipe pulled out of the ground” if Biden revokes the permit.

Kenney said he was “disappointed” in Biden’s stand and said Alberta officials hope to work with his campaign on the issue.

“It is supported by Americans and all the governors along the pipeline route,” said Kenney.

“KXL would guarantee North America energy independence.”

Kenney announced in April his government was providing $1.5 billion in equity investment and a $6-billion loan guarantee to TC Energy to get the Keystone XL project completed but so far no details have been publicly released. 

After the project is completed, Kenney said the government would sell its shares back to TC Energy but he did not say at what price.

Kenney said while the $1.5-billion has been used to put thousands of people back to work, the $6-billion part of the deal remains untouched.

The premier noted the cross border section of the pipeline has been completed and without the government’s $1.5 billion, work “wouldn’t have been able to start this year.”

He said the remainder of the money would be for the 2021 construction season which TC Energy won’t make a decision on until next January.

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi called the Biden news “terrible”.

He noted TC Energy has had many stop-and-gos in the process and “it would be ridiculous to revoke the permit at this time.

“There has been an enormous amount of work gone into the project… and it fits into Canada’s climate goals,” said Nenshi.

If it is stopped “I would feel very disappointed…it feels very late in the game now,” Nenshi said.

 In 2015, Biden was then vice-president to Barack Obama who cancelled the permit.

“It’s still the right decision now. In fact, it’s even more important today,” Stef Feldman told the CBC Monday.

“Biden strongly opposed the Keystone pipeline in the last administration, stood alongside President Obama and Secretary [of State John] Kerry to reject it in 2015, and will proudly stand in the Roosevelt Room again as president and stop it for good by rescinding the Keystone XL pipeline permit.”

When he was elected, Trump overruled the Obama decision and approved the oft-delayed pipeline for construction.

Environmental groups in the States have fought tooth-and-nail in an effort to stop the pipeline.

A judge in Montana put a halt to further construction of the pipeline over concerns of what effects the project may have on endangered species.

The federal judge ordered the U.S. Army Corp. of Engineers to conduct a further review and barred it from authorizing dredging in waterways covered by the permit.

The Keystone pipeline runs from Alberta to refineries in Illinois and Texas.

The new pipeline would run from Hardisty, Alberta to Steele City, Nebraska.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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