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R.C.M.P. warn against threatening an officer with COVID-19

The public is asked to abide by local, provincial, and federal health orders issued for public safety.

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An Alberta man was charged with multiple offences after coughing on officers and claiming to be positive for COVID-19.

On Sunday afternoon, RCMP officers responded to a disturbance complaint in Wetaskiwin, a city an hour south of Edmonton. The complaint was in regards to a man who was “yelling and swearing” at a residence in the city.

“The male stated he had COVID-19, and coughed intentionally into an officer’s face and again when escorted to the police car,” according to the press release.

“The male intentionally coughed into another officer’s face when being processed at the detachment.”

Dwight Tootosis, 59, of Wetaskiwin, was charged with two counts of assault on a police officer, two counts of failure to comply with undertaking, one count of mischief under $5,000 and failure to comply with the Public Health Act.

“The threat to transmit the COVID-19 virus is a threat to the wellbeing and health of our members which is a criminal offence,” said Assistant Commissioner John Ferguson, Alberta RCMP’s Officer-in-Charge of Criminal Operations.

“To actually carry out these threats would be (a criminal offence:) Assault on a Peace Officer.”

There has only been one charge laid in Alberta to date.

“We want Albertans to know that their provincial police force is fully operational, and continues to ensure the safety and security of Albertans,” a Tuesday press release said.

“These times are unprecedented… members of the public are reminded to adhere to current public health guidelines with respect to slowing the spread of COVID-19.”

First responders in Canada are more at risk because they are required to interact with the public, Over the past month, more than 200 healthcare workers have tested positive for the virus.

In Calgary, additional personal protective equipment (PPE) has been made available to first responders in the city including safety glasses, gloves and coveralls for Calgary Police.

Calgary Police Superintendent Steve Barlow said members are to take precautions prior to entering residences or premises.

Supt. Steve Barlow also said on Wednesday that Artur Pawlowski, a street preacher who is known to police, was issued a ticket for hosting a public gathering of more than 15 people at Olympic Plaza, and a second charge was laid against a person displaying novel coronavirus symptoms for refusal to self-isolate.

The Alberta government has made testing more readily available to first responders in healthcare including police officers, peace officers, bylaw officers and fish and wildlife officers.

Ontario has also moved to provide additional information on COVID-19 statuses, including whether someone is positive and who their contacts may have been.

“First responders put their lives on the line every day to protect Ontarians and they are at great risk of being directly exposed to COVID-19 as they fulfill their frontline duties,” said Ontario’s Deputy Premier and Minister of Health Christine Elliott, and Solicitor General Sylvia Jones.

A Saskatchewan woman – who was fined for violating the public health order in the province – then tested positive for COVID-19. Saskatchewan officials deemed the public information to override the privacy policies in the province.

The woman was originally fined for refusing to comply with the 14-day isolation period – a problem that has been seen in other provinces, including B.C., where a man visited hospitals and COVID floors to “investigate the real story” behind COVID-19.

“This is just absolutely appalling and completely unacceptable, this individual is just a complete idiot,” B.C.’s Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth said.

“There’s absolutely no place for this kind of nonsense, this kind of anti-science moronic behaviour, it’s just totally beyond the pale.”

The public is asked to abide by local, provincial, and federal health orders issued for public safety.

Provinces have granted authority to fine those who disregard health orders anywhere between $1,000 and $25,000 and jail time.

Provincial COVID-19 numbers as of today:

  • Quebec: 10,031 confirmed and presumptive cases, including 175 deaths
  • Ontario: 5,276 cases, including 174 deaths
  • Alberta: 1,423 confirmed and presumptive cases including 518 recoveries and 29 deaths
  • British Columbia: 1,336 confirmed cases, including 838 recovered and 48 deaths
  • Saskatchewan: 271 confirmed cases including 103 recoveries and 3 deaths
  • Nova Scotia: 342 confirmed cases, including 77 recoveries and one death
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: 232 confirmed cases including 74 recoveries and 2 deaths
  • Manitoba: 221 confirmed cases, including 69 recoveries and 3 deaths
  • New Brunswick: 108 confirmed cases and 50 recoveries
  • Prince Edward Island: 24 confirmed cases including 17 recovered
  • Northwest Territories: 4 confirmed cases
  • Yukon: 7 confirmed cases

Deirdre Mitchell-MacLean is a Senior Reporter with Western Standard
dmaclean@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter @Mitchell_AB

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UPDATED: Saskatchewan election called

Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe will send the province into an election Tuesday.

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Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe will send the province into an election Tuesday.

Moe took to twitter Monday night to tell voters they would be going to the polls in the middle of a COVID-19 pandemic.

“Tomorrow, I will ask Lt. Gov. Russ Mirasty to dissolve the Legislature,” Moe tweeted.

“This will be quite a different #skvotes campaign –but a very important one that will ask Saskatchewan voters one question: Who do you trust to lead Saskatchewan’s economic recovery?”

When the legislature was dissolved, Moe’s Saskatchewan Party held a 46-13 lead over the NDP.

Moe was sworn in as premier in 2018.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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CORY MORGAN WEBCAST: Wild goose hunt, Alberta style

An interview with Jason Siliker of Canadian Premier Hunts on the multiple times that the RCMP interrupted his goose hunt.

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B.C. Liberals vow to cancel PST for one year; return at 3 per cent

“Everybody pays the PST, so everybody saves under the B.C. Liberal plan,” said Andrew Wilkinson

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B.C. Liberals say, if elected, they will help the economy recover by removing the 7 per cent provincial sales tax for one year.

After a year, a Liberal government would set the PST at 3 per cent until the economy recovers.

The federal GST is currently 5 per cent.

“British Columbians have lost confidence in the direction of the province and the weak economic record of the NDP. B.C. families and small businesses need help now, which is why a B.C. Liberal government will immediately eliminate the PST for one year — saving you money right away, getting more people working, and bringing investment back to B.C.,” said B.C. Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson.

“Countless people are still out of work, small businesses are facing bankruptcy, and the public health threat from COVID-19 is still very real.

“Eliminating PST puts more money in people’s pockets, stimulates growth for struggling small business, and helps British Columbians who are struggling to get by. This is a vital step to rebuild our economy.”

The Liberals say a family of four earning $60,000 per parent will save $1,714 in the first year, followed by an additional $979 in the second year. 

“Everybody pays the PST, so everybody saves under the B.C. Liberal plan,” said Wilkinson.

The Canadian Taxpayers Federation is applauding the pledge.

“We pay the PST on everything from used cars to toilet paper so this would save everyone a lot of money,” said Kris Sims, B.C. Director of the CTF.

“The best way to save people money is for governments to stop taking so much of it in the first place.

“We hope all of the parties can match or beat this promise so we can get serious about tax cuts during this election.”

In the 2019-20 budget year, British Columbians paid more than $7.5 billion in the PST.

“We need to do all we can to jolt our economy back to life and eliminating the PST would clear a lot of hurdles for working people and struggling businesses to get things rolling again,” said Sims.

“People know how to spend their money much better than the government does.”

B.C. residents go to the polls Oct. 24.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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