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Trudeau brushes off May and Bloc’s call to let Alberta oilpatch die

Instead, Trudeau sees a future for things like oil sands developments as part of Canada’s new, greener economy.

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Thursday rebuffed calls to let the Alberta oilpatch wither and die.

Instead, Trudeau sees a future for things like oil sands developments as part of Canada’s new, greener economy.

“If we are to move forward in transforming our economy towards lower emissions and cleaner processes, workers and innovators in Alberta and across the country in the energy sector are going to be an essential part of that transformation,” said Trudeau at his daily press conference in Ottawa.

“As we move forward to a different energy mix, to lower fossil fuel emissions, lower green house gas emissions, we need the innovation, the hard work, and the vision and the creativity of people working right now in the energy sector. We need to support Albertans, and other people working in the energy sector, through this incredible, difficult time.

“We need their capacity to innovate, and figure out how we’re going to move forward towards our greater, greener goals. We can’t do it without them.”

On Wednesday, both Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet and former Green Party leader Elizabeth May said Trudeau should use the COVID-19 pandemic as a starting point to let the energy industry die.

Courtesy Wikipedia

“My heart bleeds for people who believe the sector is going to come back. It’s not,” May told reporters Wednesday.

“Oil is dead and for people in the sector, it’s very important there be just transition funds.”

Blanchet agreed with May’s remarks, saying oil is “never coming back.”

Yves-François Blanchet

“Putting any more money in that business is a very bad idea,” he said.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney lashed back Thursday afternoon saying comments by May and Blanchet were “deeply regrettable.

“They are piling on at a time of great trial.,” said Kenney, noting Quebec is currently enjoying $13 billion in transfer payments, mainly from Alberta, which is being used to fight that province’s fight against COVID-19.

“Please stop kicking us when we are down. These attacks are unwarranted, divisive, and I believe at times like this un-Canadian.”

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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Kenney says Alberta considering joining gun legal battle

Kenney has previous said Alberta will begin appointing its own chief firearms officer, which had previously been chosen by Ottawa.

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Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says Alberta is looking at getting intervener status in upcoming court challenges to the federal Liberals new gun control laws.

“We believe that individual citizens who are impacted by these new regulations would have a stronger standing in a court challenge, and we are serious about potentially coming in to support a legal action by an individual citizen or group of citizens,” Kenney said Wednesday in announcing two new gun initiatives in Alberta.

Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe has made similar comments about his provinces joining the court battle.

Kenney has previous said Alberta will begin appointing its own chief firearms officer, which had previously been chosen by Ottawa.

Ontario, Quebec, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick already appoint their own chief officers.

The Western Standard earlier reported the RCMP are quietly adding more guns to the list of 1,500 banned by the federal government earlier this month.

The RCMP, which manages the FRT through the Canadian Firearms Program, sent a statement confirming the re-classification was taking place beyond the original list of 1,500, and so far no public notification has taken place.

Alberta announced Wednesday, Alberta is establishing a provincial firearms examination unit to speed up testing of guns that have been seized as evidence in criminal investigations and striking a firearms panel to help advise the government.

While the Calgary Police Service (CPS) carries out this testing in its own facility and the Edmonton Police Service (EPS) is establishing a lab of its own, most police services in Alberta rely on the RCMP’s National Forensic Laboratory Services in Ottawa to fulfil this requirement with a straightforward test-firing procedure.

“In the fall of 2019, data indicated it was taking an average of eight months for the national RCMP laboratory to process a routine firearms testing request from Alberta. To prevent lengthy court delays from putting the prosecution of violent criminals at risk, Alberta is ending its reliance on the federal laboratory by establishing a provincial unit to perform tests on firearms used in crimes,” the government said in a release.

“Justice and Solicitor General is working on a plan with its partners at CPS, EPS, RCMP and Alberta Law Enforcement Response Teams (ALERT) to establish a team and protocols for conducting firearms testing at the existing lab in Calgary and the forthcoming facility in Edmonton.”

In early May, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Friday they are banning 1,500 different makes and models of what he called “military-style” and “assault-style” guns in Canada.

The ban came into effect immediately and was ordered by the cabinet without any bill or debate in Parliament.

The Liberals campaigned in the last election to ban assault rifles and introduce legislation allowing cities to ban handguns.

The federal government still has to work out the details of a buy-back program to compensate the owners of previous legal firearms.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Sharpton mocks Trudeau over 21-second pause

Trudeau gazed ahead for a full 21 seconds before he started to answer the question.

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Controversial U.S. preacher Rev. Al Sharpton took a jab at Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for taking 21 seconds before he answered a question about rioting south of the border.

In a press conference on Wednesday, Trudeau was asked about what he thought of the situation in the U.S. and the actions of President Donald Trump.

Trudeau gazed ahead for a full 21 seconds before he started to answer the question.

When asked by a Canadian news crew in the States about recent event non Thursday, Sharpton gave an impassioned answer about how he was tired of preaching at funerals of African Americans killed by police and that the death of Minneapolis man George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer would be a turning point in American race relations.

“I’m going to express that in my eulogy, and since you’re from Canada, I won’t have a 21 second gap before I say what I have to say,” Sharpton said.

Rev. Al Sharpton

During eight nights of rioting, thousands of people of been arrested and hundreds of police officers injured.

The police officer who arrested George has been charged with second-degree murder.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Stockwell Day forced to step down from CBC, corporate boards for saying Canadians aren’t racist

“But are Canadians largely and in majority racist? No, we are not.”

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Former Opposition leader Stockwell Day has stepped down from two corporate boards and a role as a TV commentator after he told the CBC Canadians aren’t racist.

Day was asked on CBC’s Power & Politics show about comments made by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau that Canada had a problem with systemic racism.

“We have to recognize that our system is not perfect in Canada,” Day said.

“Yes, there’s a few idiot racists hanging around but Canada is not a racist country and most Canadians are not racist. And our system, that always needs to be improved, is not systemically racist.”

“Should I have gone through school and been mocked because I had glasses and was called four-eyes and because of the occupation of my parents?” Day asked.

“Should I have been mocked for all that? No, of course not. But are Canadians largely and in majority racist? No, we are not.

“We celebrate our diversity around the world and for the prime minister to insinuate — and it is an insinuation — that our system is systemically racist is wrong.”

It wasn’t long before Twitter became a baying mob of people arguing Day – a cabinet minister under the government of Stephen Harper – was wrong.

Shortly after Day issued his own statement.

“By feedback from many in the Black and other communities I realize my comments in debate on Power and Politics were insensitive and hurtful. I ask forgiveness for wrongly equating my experiences to theirs. I commit to them my unending efforts to fight racism in all its forms.,” Day said in a tweet Wednesday.

The fallout continued with Day stepping down from his role on the CBC panel, the board of directors at Telus and as a strategic adviser for McMillan LLP.

“At McMillan LLP, we believe that systemic racism is real and that it can only be addressed when each of us — as individuals and organizations — commits to meaningful change,” the company said in a statement.

“Yesterday, Stockwell Day made comments during a televised interview that run counter to this view. Today, he offered his resignation as a strategic advisor at our firm and it was accepted.”

In a statement, Telus said: “The views expressed by Mr. Day during yesterday’s broadcast of Power & Politics are not reflective of the values and beliefs of our organization.”

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

Twitter.com/nobby7694

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