fbpx
Connect with us

News

Trudeau’s firearms buy back plan will be billion-dollar boondoggle, says expert

“However, the actual full cost of the ‘buy back’ won’t be $600 million; it will be much more.”

mm

Published

on

A Canadian firearms expert says the Trudeau Liberal government’s plan to buy buy recently prohibited firearms from Canadian gun owners could end up costing up to $5-billion.

Gary Mauser, Senior Fellow at the Fraser Institute, said whatever plan the Liberals come up with will likely end up being a billion-dollar boondoggle.

Trudeau announced the banning 1,500 different makes and models of what he called “military-style” and “assault-style” guns in Canada.

The federal government still has to work out the details of a buy-back program to compensate the owners of previous legal firearms.

“Minister (Bill) Blair claimed the cost for the “buy back” of roughly 250,000 firearms would be between $400 million and $600 million—$375 million for the guns and presumably the rest for overhead. That is, if owners comply,” Mauser wrote in a January blog, published before the firearms ban was announced.

“However, the actual full cost of the ‘buy back’ won’t be $600 million; it will be much more.

“Focusing on reimbursement costs is misleading because it ignores the biggest expense—staffing costs. Prohibiting and confiscating an estimated 250,000 firearms is a complex undertaking and would involve considerable government resources. It’s impossible to do with current police resources.”

Gary Mauser

Mauser then laid out steps the feds will have to take to make any buy back scheme work.

“Here’s a rough outline of the steps involved in the nation-wide confiscation program:

  • draw up plans for the entire project and secure approval from Trudeau’s cabinet
  • identify, as specifically as possible, the firearms to be confiscated and announce the list
  • evaluate information and processing capacity, possibly develop new computer systems
  • identify and notify owners of soon-to-be-confiscated firearms
  • organize the physical set up for collecting the firearms (e.g. arrange secure office space for collection points and train the police and clerks who will accept surrendered firearms)
  • staff the collection points so surrendered firearms may be assessed and processed
  • identify and hire venders who will destroy the collected guns
  • process payments to the former owners
  • physically collect and ship the firearms, and then destroy the firearms

“Plus, of course, there will be an advertising program to persuade the public that confiscating legally-purchased and legally-used firearms will “make Canada safer.”

Mauser wrote that if everything went according to plan for setting up the infrastructure to buy back weapons could be up to $2.7 billion.

“Based on these assumptions, confiscating 250,000 firearms would cost the Canadian taxpayer between $1.6 billion to almost $5 billion in the first year. This estimate excludes travel costs and any ministerial administrators,” he wrote.

“Remember, this is just part of the costs to taxpayers for the “buy back.” These estimates do not include the $600 million the government promises to pay owners who surrender their firearms.”

Mauser then compared the cost of any Canadian buy back plan to one that happened in 2019 in New Zealand.

 Guns to be collected2019 populationGeographic sizeNumber of collection points
New Zealand175,0004.8 million268,000 km2524
Canada250,00037.6 million10,000,000 km24,100 to 19,500
Courtesy Fraser Insitute

“Following the New Zealand model, Canada would require between 4,100 and 19,500 collection points. I will assume the minimum number of collection points (4,100) in the following estimate. Each collection point must be staffed by either hiring new police officers or diverting current police personnel away from other policing duties,” Mauser wrote.

He came up with the following information:

AssumptionsCollection pointsStaff at each collection pointTotal StaffCost per employeeTotal
Minimum4,100416,400$100,000$1.64 billion
Maximum4,100832,800$150,000$4.92 billion
Courtesy Fraser Institute

“Based on these assumptions, confiscating 250,000 firearms would cost the Canadian taxpayer between $1.6 billion to almost $5 billion in the first year. This estimate excludes travel costs and any ministerial administrators,” Mauser concluded.

“Remember, this is just part of the costs to taxpayers for the “buy back.” These estimates do not include the $600 million the government promises to pay owners who surrender their firearms. 

“It seems clear from my rough calculation that just one of the required steps needed to complete a “buy-back” program of the nature contemplated by this federal government would include costs well over $1.5 billion with many additional costs, some of which would be difficult to even estimate in advance. One thing is certain—the costs will greatly exceed the $600 million presented thus far by the government.”

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westewrnstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

News

Alberta school changes will produce ‘nutbar…right-wing warriors’, top NDP official says

McGowan is the president of the Alberta Federation of Labour and was an NDP candidate in the 2015 federal election.

mm

Published

on

New laws governing Alberta’s education system are aimed at producing “nutbar…right-wing warriors”, says a prominent NDP member.

“UCP paves the way for nutbar religious charter schools & home-schooling that doesn’t follow the curriculum. They’re trying to create an army of brainwashed right-wing warriors. And they accused the NDP of being too political with education! #ableg #abpoli” tweeted Gil McGowan Thursday afternoon.

McGowan is the president of the Alberta Federation of Labour and was an NDP candidate in the 2015 federal election.

mcgown tweet

“To add insult to injury, this will pave the way for a money grab so that the government can use YOUR tax dollars to help fund these crazy right-wing, religious schools. No other province gives more public money to fund private schools than Alberta.”

McGowan was going ballistic after Education Minister Adriana LaGrange, said she’s making good on an election promise to safeguard parent choice in education introduced Bill 15, the Choice in Education Act.

The AFL gets automatic seats on the provincial NDP board.

“It is completely unacceptable that the head of the NDP-affiliated Alberta Federation of Labour would call families of students who are homeschooled or attend a charter school nutbars,” LaGrange said in a statement to the Western Standard.

“Unlike this NDP affiliate, our government stands with all parents, regardless of how they choose to educate their children. Rachel Notley and the NDP must condemn this hateful, bigoted rhetoric.”

LaGrange said the bill strengthens the idea that parents have the right to choose the type of education their children receive, through amendments to the Education Act.

Premier Jason Kenney told reporters the proposed legislation is important because there continues to be special interest groups and political parties in Alberta who undermine the right.

“This legislation won’t let them do so in the future,” he said. 

Courtesy Alberta Education

“This legislation enshrines the belief of Albertans in freedom, diversity, pluralism and choice as well as parental responsibility. Because we believe that parents know better than politicians or bureaucrats about what’s in the best interests of their kids.”

 Bill 15 changes the home education programs section of the Education Act, allowing for “unsupervised notification-only, non-funded home education program,” meaning those students would no longer need to be supervised by an Alberta school board.

Parents would have to submit an education plan that shows the ministry the student would have the opportunity to achieve appropriate learning outcomes.

The bill also proposes changes to how charter schools can start. 

Current laws say that those wishing to establish a charter school have to go to the school board in the area and request that the board establish an alternative program before considering the charter application. 

Under the proposed changes, those wishing to establish a charter school would go directly to the minister. 

There hasn’t been a single charter school application since Kenney took office.

“The waiting list for charter schools is unacceptably long. Last I heard, there were 14,000 students province-wide waiting for a position in a charter school,” he said.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

Twitter.com/nobby7694

Continue Reading

News

RCMP quietly adding more firearms to the banned list

The RCMP sent a statement confirming the re-classification was taking place beyond the original list of 1,500, and so far no public notification has taken place.

mm

Published

on

The RCMP are quietly adding more guns to the list of 1,500 banned by the federal government earlier this month.

Maple Ridge, B.C., gun store co-owner Matt Mendel said he heard rumours that more and more firearms were being banned, and sure enough, when he started checking weapons his store was selling in the national Firearms Reference Table (FRT), it was true.

He said most of the firearms added to the list were shotguns.

The RCMP, which manages the FRT through the Canadian Firearms Program, sent a statement to CBC confirming the re-classification was taking place beyond the original list of 1,500, and so far no public notification has taken place.

“The Canadian Firearms Program (CFP) has been working diligently to ensure that the FRT is updated to reflect all of the classification changes resulting from the Order in Council issued May 1st,” read the statement to the CBC.

Mendel said the Typhoon F12, a semi-automatic shotgun, was listed as non-restricted on May 14, but then a subsequent FRT search the following day showed it as prohibited.

“If I wasn’t a diligent business owner and constantly kept my ear to the ground with this sort of thing, I could have been selling illegal firearms to people, and people could be possessing illegal firearms without even knowing it,” Mendel told CBC.

The store stands to lose $30,000 to $40,000 for a dozen firearm models that have been reclassified as prohibited.

“As a business, we just hold on to that and we lose that money. We’ve paid for those firearms, and now they’ll sit in my basement … forever essentially,” said Mendel.

In early May, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Friday they are banning 1,500 different makes and models of what he called “military-style” and “assault-style” guns in Canada.

The ban came into effect immediately and was ordered by the cabinet without any bill or debate in Parliament.

The Liberals campaigned in the last election to ban assault rifles and introduce legislation allowing cities to ban handguns.

The federal government still has to work out the details of a buy-back program to compensate the owners of previous legal firearms.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

Twitter.com/nobby7694

Continue Reading

News

Disgraced CBC radio host Jian Ghomeshi back on the air

Roqe, a new Ghomeshi-hosted podcast focusing on “the in-depth life stories, opinions, and identities of personalities in the Iranian diaspora,” launched in mid-April

mm

Published

on

Shamed broadcaster Jian Ghomeshi is back on the air with a podcast focussing on Iranian issues.

Roqe, a new Ghomeshi-hosted podcast focusing on “the in-depth life stories, opinions, and identities of personalities in the Iranian diaspora,” launched in mid-April, Canadaland reported.

Ghomeshi has published seven episodes of the podcast ranging from 36 to 75 minutes in length. 

Canadaland reports “Roqe” is a Farsi word that translates as “candid, or straightforward in conversation.” 

Roqe

In 2014 and 2015, Ghomeshi was the subject of allegations of sexual harassment or assault from 20 women and men and was later arrested. In late 2015, Ghomeshi  pleaded not guilty to the charges and the trial began in early 2016.

He was acquitted of five of the charges on March 24, 2016. On May 11, 2016, the Crown withdrew the last remaining charge after Ghomeshi signed a peace bond and apologized to his accuser.

He was fired from the CBC in October 2014.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

Twitter.com/nobby7694

Continue Reading

Sign up for the Western Standard Newsletter

Free news and updates
* = required field

Trending

Copyright © Western Standard owned by Wildrose Media Corp.