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ALBERTA RCMP justified in shoot-out that killed murderer on the run

Eleven RCMP officers were justified in unleashing a fusillade of 202 shots to bring down a Calgary man wanted for the murder of his girlfriend.

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Eleven RCMP officers were justified in unleashing a fusillade of 202 shots to bring down a Calgary man wanted for the murder of his girlfriend.

The Alberta Serious Incident Response Team said the incident near Evansburg was particularly “harrowing.”

On March 25, 2018, Calgary woman Nadia El-Dib was stabbed 40 times, had her throat slit and was shot by Abderrahmane ‘Adam’ Bettahar in Marlborough Park.

Nadia El-Dib

On the morning of March 29, CPS advised RCMP officers that evidence placed the fugitive in the Evansburg area. He was believed to be armed with a CSA VZ.58 semi-automatic rifle and driving a dark blue 2004 Ford Explorer sport utility vehicle. 

“The man had made statements to the effect that he would not go down without a fight. This information was shared with RCMP officers in the detachments west of Edmonton along the Highway 16 corridor,” said ASIRT in a Thursday release.

At 5:13, an uniformed RCMP officer spotted the vehicle and started to follow.

Efforts to conduct a traffic stop of the vehicle were not successful and at 5:17 p.m., a police pursuit ensued.

The pursuit continued for approximately 70 minutes and covered approximately 140 kilometres, traveling north on Highway 22 onto Highway 16, the release said.

The pursuit travelled east and west on Highway 16 as the man changed direction on the highway several times. As the pursuit continued, additional officers and police vehicles joined in. RCMP coordinated the response so that additional officers were positioned at intersections ahead of the pursuit to prevent civilians from accessing the highway and entering into the potentially dangerous ongoing event, and to prevent the man from escaping onto rural roads.

The man successfully evaded four separate attempts to deploy spike belts during the pursuit. A fifth spike belt, placed on Highway 16 eastbound at Range Road 112, succeeded in damaging the vehicle’s tires but the man was able to drive further until his vehicle became inoperable and stopped just east of Range Road 83, in the eastbound lanes of Highway 16.

ASIRT said as the vehicle slowed down, the man made a sharp 45-degree turn, coming to a stop angled across a portion of the outside eastbound lane of the highway, exposing the passenger side of the vehicle to the pursuing police vehicles. The placement of the vehicle provided a tactically advantageous position, providing cover and protection while the man fired upon police.

“Civilian witnesses travelling in the westbound lanes of Highway 16 reported seeing the man exit his vehicle with what was described as a rifle or ‘machine gun,’ and immediately drop to one knee to take a firing stance, pointing at police ‘like he knew what he was doing.’

Bettahar’s CSA VZ.58 semi-automatic rifle
Courtesy ASIRT

“The man immediately fired a shot at the closest RCMP vehicle, while the officer was exiting his marked police vehicle. The man again fired upon that officer, causing a head injury. It was immediately apparent to some of the nearby RCMP officers that this officer had been shot, and that he appeared to have some sort of head injury that was bleeding profusely, though his initial status was unknown.

“As soon as the man began firing on the officers, officers took positions of cover and eleven of the officers returned fire, firing multiple rounds from assorted duty firearms.

“It was difficult for the officers to assess whether they had disabled the man, as he was behind the vehicle and hard to see. What followed was an exchange of gunfire between RCMP officers and the man that lasted for about two minutes.

“During the firefight, independent witnesses saw that the man appeared to be reloading his firearm as he sheltered behind his disabled vehicle. He fired additional rounds at the RCMP officers/vehicles from a position of cover behind the driver’s side of the Ford Explorer.

“One minute and twelve seconds after the start of the gunfire, one of the officers near the front waved his arm, directing officers to ‘cease fire.’ One last shot was fired, when an officer perceived movement.

During the firefight, the injured officer crawled towards the back of his police vehicle, hampered by the head injury and blood obscuring his vision. He was pulled to safety through the concerted efforts of multiple officers to provide cover and physical assistance, ASIRT said.

At 6:28 p.m., an officer travelling in the westbound lanes came upon the scene and confirmed that the man appeared to be down. Based on the available evidence, the man had fired 10 rounds, while a total of 202 police rounds are believed to have been fired between the eleven subject officers, said the release.

ASIRT said the injured officer suffered what would turn out, “miraculously”, to be only a grazing wound across the top of his head, leaving his skull intact, with shrapnel in his scalp and a concussion. A second officer on scene suffered several lacerations or abrasions on his arm and the back of the neck, believed to be from shrapnel from nearby bullet strikes.

The blue Ford Explorer suffered extensive damage: every window was shot out and the body of the vehicle had taken numerous bullet strikes. Three police vehicles also sustained damage from bullet strikes.

An autopsy determined that the man died of multiple gunshot wounds. One of the most serious gunshot wounds severed the cervical spinal cord, and lacerated both the left common carotid artery and left internal jugular. A toxicology report determined that the man had neither drugs nor alcohol in his system at the time of his death.

“The man had no prior criminal record. The CSA VZ.58 semi-automatic rifle, which was the weapon believed to have been used in the murder of Ms. El-Dib, was recovered on scene and found to have an empty magazine but one remaining live round in the chamber. The gun and its ammunition had the capacity to penetrate police soft body armour. A receipt recovered from the man’s wallet demonstrated that his gun had been purchased on May 10, 2018, along with a membership to a Calgary gun club.

“It would be fair to describe this event as harrowing. It is a shocking example of the risks police can face at any time. While the man was extremely young and had no criminal record, factors that might suggest an easier or less risky apprehension, the calculated positioning of his vehicle permitted him to fire on police from a position of cover which prolonged the incident. His choice to open fire on officers was deliberate and immediate, and there can be no question that he presented a lethal risk. He was shooting to kill, not just to provoke a police response.”

“In the circumstances, viewing the incident as a whole, the eleven officers’ resort to the use of lethal force, made only upon the man’s firing first upon police, was reasonable and justified.”

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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HEAR THE TAPES: Secret tapes of CNN execs talking about shaping the news to be released

James O’Keefe, from Project Veritas released a tape Tuesday morning of CNN executives sitting in stunned silence when they were informed the tapes were going to be released.

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Secretly recorded tapes of CNN’s editorial morning meetings are being released Tuesday night.

James O’Keefe, from Project Veritas released a tape Tuesday morning of CNN executives sitting in stunned silence when they were informed the tapes were going to be released.

CNN president Jeff Zucker ordered the Tuesday called stopped and demanded new procedures for the morning call.

O’Keefe unmuted himself and revealed to them he has two months worth of recordings provided by a “brave inside sources.”

He said the recordings between Zucker and producers will show the thinking behind CNN’s slanted news.

“I think Mr. Zucker is shaking in his boots right now. I think he’s very afraid of what may be coming,” said O’Keefe.

Project veritas tweet

The hashtag #CNNtapes will start releasing the tapes at 7 p.m. (EST) Tuesday night and throughout the week.

Project Veritas is an American right-leaning activist group founded by O’Keefe in 2010. The group uses undercover techniques to reveal supposed liberal bias and alleged corruption. 

In an email to group supporters, O’Keefe said that the recording that they will “be releasing will give you some insight as to why Zucker has such a tough time answering questions about journalistic integrity.”

This is one of the first tapes.

And here is the second:

The Western Standard will update the story as the tapes are released.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Liberals backtrack on section of gun grab law

The new policy was to come into effect Monday, but has been put off until Dec. 1, 2023.

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Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government is deferring the “marking” section of their gun grab law.

The new policy was to come into effect Monday, but has been put off until December 1, 2023.

“The existing Firearms Marking Regulations under the Firearms Act, scheduled to come into force on December 1, 2020, have been deferred until December 1, 2023. The Government will use the deferral period to continue consulting with partners and develop an effective markings regime that is appropriate for Canada, balancing the needs of law enforcement with the impact on firearms businesses and owners, while prioritizing public safety,” said the government in a release.

“Firearms markings enables law enforcement to trace crime guns, and is most successful when paired with records of ownership and imports.

“In the absence of record-keeping requirements for non-restricted firearms, consultations with law enforcement and industry led to the conclusion that the existing Regulations, as conceived in 2004, are ineffective in facilitating successful tracing of crime guns.

“While the Regulations have been deferred, the Government remains committed to firearms markings regulations as part of its broader firearms strategy to protect public safety, including the prohibition of “assault-style” firearms announced this past spring.”

On May 1, 2020, the federal government prohibited buying, using and selling thousands of firearms.

There are 316,791 licensed firearms owners in Alberta.

The national police union that represents the RCMP has blasted the gun grab plan for doing nothing to stop the flow of illegal guns into the country, and driving previously legal firearms into the black market.

The union said 2,242 illegal guns used in crimes in Canada last year were traced back to manufacturers in the U.S. Three of the four firearms used in the tragic mass shooting in Portapique, N.S, in April 2020, were obtained illegally in the U.S.

The union said Stats Canada data shows Canada reported 678 homicides in 2019, and that 261 (38 per cent) of them were gun-related fatal shootings.

Of those 261 homicides, over 60 per cent were committed with a handgun, as opposed to a rifle.

Trudeau’s Liberal government announced in May they are banning 1,500 different makes and models of what he called “military-style” and “assault-style” guns in Canada. Most firearms experts say that the Liberal failed to define what constitutes “military-style” and “assault-style” firearms beyond aesthetics.

The ban came into effect immediately and was ordered by the cabinet without any bill or debate in Parliament.

In response to the federal order, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe said their provinces will look at appointing its own chief firearms officers.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Farrell calls for Calgary law to ban cat-calls

Calling in “street harassment”, Coun. Druh Farrell is calling for public input on a potential bylaw to make such actions illegal.

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The old caricature of construction workers cat-calling when a pretty girl walks by could soon be outlawed in Calgary.

Calling it “street harassment”, Councilor Druh Farrell is calling for public input on a potential bylaw to make such actions illegal.

Farrell said street harassment includes things like unwelcome comments, gestures and actions made primarily to women by people they don’t know. 

“It’s most frequently an attack, a verbal attack on women but it’s also against many LGBTQ people,” Farrell told CBC.

“We certainly see that harassment happening in Calgary.”

Farrell said a Statistics Canada report that found one-in-three girls and women were victims of unwanted sexual behaviour in the previous year.

“With all of our bylaws, we look at education first and then establish a social norm. It’s not OK to harass strangers on the street,” said Farrell to CBC.

She notes other Canadian cities including Edmonton, Vancouver and London have already passed bylaws to regulate street harassment.

If Farrell’s motion is approved by council, they would get a report back from administration on the issue in the first quarter of 2022.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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