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Former Alberta NDP Minister: People shouldn’t jump to conclusions about Communism

“I know some people will see the word Communist and jump to all kinds of conclusions but I’d say give it a read before you do that, it may surprise you,” Shaye Anderson said.

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Just give Communism a try, you might like it.

That’s the message from former Alberta NDP cabinet minister Shaye Anderson, who served as municipal affairs minister under Rachel Notley’s government.

“This is a good read. I know some people will see the word Communist and jump to all kinds of conclusions but I’d say give it a read before you do that, it may surprise you,” Anderson tweeted Monday in response to an article written by Elizabeth Rowley, the leader of the Communist Party of Canada.

Anderson tweet

The article, in a Communist website called The People’s Choice, covered a variety of tops including the COVID-19 pandemic and the rioting over police racism.

“The pandemic has underlined all the ills of capitalism. These include privatization and deregulation, tax cuts for the rich and the corporations, trade deals that destroy manufacturing and secondary industry, low wages and precarious work, growing poverty and insecurity,” Rowley wrote.

Elizabeth Rowley
Courtesy YouTube

“Eighty percent of COVID-related deaths in Canada have occurred among residents and workers in long-term care (LTC) homes. Most of these are private, for profit operations that are under-staffed, under-funded, and largely unregulated. LTC must be brought under public healthcare and treated as a public service with federal standards, needs-based staffing and funding.

“It is now clear to everyone that ‘we’re not all in this together.’ The wealthy have managed quite nicely. But the poor and unemployed, and those living and working in cramped or unaffordable housing without childcare, are in desperate straits and much more likely to become infected by the virus.

“While Cuba and China have been providing supplies, equipment and teams of healthcare workers to countries around the world, private producers of essential supplies and equipment in the capitalist countries have raised their prices, selling to the highest bidders.”

In the wake of race riots in the U.S., Rowley called for the disarming of police forces.

“The Central Committee received Party Executive’s previously issued statement supporting the protests and demanding an end to police killings and the systemic racism and violence against Black, Indigenous and racialized peoples. The statement noted that this oppression is a built-in feature of capitalism, which helps generate vast super-profits for the biggest exploiters, the large national and transnational corporations,” she wrote.

“The CC reiterated the Party’s long-standing demands for radical reform of policing. These include charging, prosecuting and sentencing police for crimes such as murder, rape and assault; demilitarizing police forces and disarming most police units, and putting an end to racial profiling and carding; enacting strong civilian control over police; slashing police and military budgets and redirecting those funds to civilian and social spending; and abolishing CSIS, the CSE and RCMP, as well as “anti-terrorist” legislation that threatens civil and democratic rights.”

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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Major parties in Alberta nearly tied in latest fundraising

Between July and September, with the United Conservative Party raised $1,199,941.32 and the NDP $1,126,580.38.

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The UCP and NDP came close to a dead heat in raising cash during the last quarter.

Between July and September, with the United Conservative Party raised $1,199,941.32 and the NDP $1,126,580.38.

The UCP almost doubled from the $642,677 raised in the second quarter of 2020, compared to $1,032,796.85 for the NDP in that period.

More than 80 per cent of this quarter’s contributions coming in sums larger than $250 for the UCP.

In comparison, the NDP continue to collect a large number of donations in smaller sums, with 47 per cent of donations in amounts less than $250.

Here is what the political parties raised during the third quarter of 2020:

  • UCP $1,199,941.32
  • NDP $1,126,580.38
  • Alberta Party $35,654.25
  • Wildrose Independence Party $28,717.00
  • Liberal Party $17,026.78
  • Green Party  $1,505.00
  • Independence Party $1,215.00
  • Alberta Advantage Party $907.00

The maximum annual donation to political parties was increased to $4,243 from $4.000 as of Jan. 1.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Kenney in isolation after top minister catches COVID-19

Municipal Affairs minister tests positive

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Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is in quarantine after one of his top ministers caught COVID-19.

Municipal Affairs Minister Tracy Allard revealed Wednesday afternoon she had tested positive for the virus.

As one of her close contacts, Kenney is now isolating at home.

In a statement, Allard said she is suffering from mild symptoms of the virus.

The statement said Kenney is being tested for the virus at home.

Transportation Minister Ric McIver is also isolated and being tested after having come into contact with Allard.

UCP MLAs Angela Pitt, Peter Guthrie, and Nathan Neudorff are also entering self-isolation 

On Wednesday, the province confirmed 406 new infections bringing the numbers of active cases to 3,372. 

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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NDP prop up Trudeau’s Liberals in confidence vote

The NDP move means there will be no snap election

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NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has denied Prime Minister Justin Trudeau the election he seemed to want.

Singh said early Wednesday afternoon his party would not join the Tories and Bloc to bring down the minority government in a confidence vote over an attempt to set up an anti-corruption committee.

For several weeks the Liberals have been stalling as opposition members of the finance committee work to unveil details on the WE charity scandal that has seen revelations that Trudeau’s immediate family members have benefitted by being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars from the charity.

“We’re looking at options, but I want to make Canadians absolutely clear that we are not going to give the Prime Minister the election he’s looking for,” Singh said at a news conference prior to the vote.

The NDP and the Liberals defeated the motion by a vote of 180-146.

Tory leader Erin O’Toole blasted the Trudeau manoeuvres.

“Creating a committee has never in our history been grounds for a confidence vote,” said O’Toole.

“It’s Mr. Trudeau that is making it a confidence vote because Mr. Trudeau would prefer to try and go to an election rather than (answer) questions about insider spending scandals.”

The Green Party’s three MPs also voted against the Tory motion.

“Ahead of today’s vote on the Conservative motion to create a special committee, I would like to remind all Members of Parliament that people in Canada are counting on us to keep our eye on the ball and to focus on their needs,” Green Party leader Annamie Paul said in a statement.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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