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Kenney offers Alberta as home for vandalized John A. Macdonald statue

“If the City of Montreal decides not to restore Wade’s statue of Macdonald to where it has stood for 125 years, we would be happy to receive it for installation on the grounds of Alberta’s Legislature.”

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Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says if Montreal doesn’t want its vandalized statue of Canada’s first prime minister in their city, he will put it up in front of the Alberta legislature.

Montreal police confirmed the statue of John A. Macdonald was unbolted, pulled down, decapitated and sprayed with graffiti at around 2:45 p.m. (EST)

Police were on hand but did not intervene other than to ask the crowd to disperse on a loudspeaker.

“A mob has torn down and defaced the statue of Sir John A Macdonald in Montreal. This vandalism of our history and heroes must stop. As his biographer Richard Gwyn wrote, ‘no Macdonald, no Canada.’ Both Macdonald & the country he created were flawed but still great,” Kenney tweeted Saturday.

“Many of those on the extreme left responsible for this kind of violence claim that Canada is an illegitimate state, all the while enjoying Canada’s rights, freedoms, privileges & prosperity. None of those things were created by accident. They come from the vision & sacrifice of those who went before us, particularly Macdonald himself.

Vandalized statue. Courtesy @LeighStewy

“He was an immigrant who suffered unimaginable personal trauma throughout his life, which he overcame to forge an enormous country out of divided factions. It’s right to debate his legacy and life. But it is wrong to allow roving bands of thugs to vandalize our history with impunity.

“If the City of Montreal decides not to restore Wade’s statue of Macdonald to where it has stood for 125 years, we would be happy to receive it for installation on the grounds of Alberta’s Legislature.”

Quebec premier Francois Legault said destroying statues will solve nothing.

“Whatever one might think of John A. Macdonald, destroying a monument in this way is unacceptable,” he tweeted.

“We must fight racism, but destroying parts of our history is not the solution. 

“Vandalism has no place in our democracy and the statue must be restored.”

New Conservative leader Erin O’Toole also expressed his outrage.

“Canada wouldn’t exist without Sir John A. Macdonald. Canada is a great county, and one we should be proud of. We will not build a better future by defacing our past,” he tweeted.

The organizers, who call themselves the Coalition for BIPOC Liberation, are asking for cities to reduce their police budgets by 50%.

In Victoria, in 2018, its city council voted to remove a statue of Macdonald from in front of their city hall.

City councillors voted to have the monument removed because of Macdonald’s role as “a leader of violence against Indigenous peoples” after a year of discussion.

During his time as prime minister, Macdonald’s government brought in the Indian Act and set up the residential school system.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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Notley says Kenney shouldn’t have criticized Trudeau’s Throne Speech

“I was alarmed by the comments we heard from the Premier today,” said NDP leader Rachel Notley

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Alberta NDP leader has launched an attack on Premier Jason Kenney for daring to attack Justin’s Trudeau’s Throne Speech.

“I was alarmed by the comments we heard from the Premier today – this premier is so desperate to distract Albertans from his inability to create jobs and restart economic growth that he is continuing his fake fight with Ottawa at the expense of the best interest of the people he was elected to represent,” said Notley in a statement released on Thursday.

An angry Kenney has slammed the Wednesday Liberal Throne Speech as doing nothing for Alberta, especially the crippled energy industry.

Kenney is talking to other Canadian premiers Thursday afternoon to come up with a joint response to the Throne Speech.

“In addition to losing 50,000 jobs even before the pandemic, and in addition to shrinking Alberta’s economy with his $4.7 billion corporate handout, Jason Kenney made it clear today that he is willing to put his own political interest over the possibility of a long-awaited and long overdue national drug plan,” said the Notley statement.

“This self-serving decision will undermine the quality and affordability of the health care of millions of Albertans. This is an abdication of leadership.

“Albertans deserve a leader who will do the hard work of building a real economic recovery plan, a leader who will do whatever it takes to get Albertans back to work, and a leader who is laser focused on the challenges facing Alberta, not fake fights with federal politicians.”

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Kenney’s anger at Throne Speech continues to grow

Kenney called the speech “kooky”, full of “bright shiny objects” and policy ideas that will see Alberta challenging them in the Supreme Court.

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After having a night to sleep on it, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney emerged Thursday no less angry about Justin Trudeau’s Throne Speech.

During a morning press conference, Kenney called the speech “kooky”, full of “bright shiny objects” and policy ideas that will see Alberta challenging them in the Supreme Court.

An angry Kenney said he will be talking to other premier’s later Thursday and they will issue a statement about the speech later Thursday or Friday.

The premier noted not a single word in the speech discussed the crippled oil and gas sectors in Alberta.

Nor was there any mention of the growing concern of Western Alienation.

“All premiers asked the government to focus on two things in the speech – health care and the economy,” Kenney told reporters.

“Instead we got bright shiny objects and kooky objectives.”

Kenney said he hoped the speech would offer something “to allow the energy industry that has been cut off at the knees to get back on their feet.

“Instead we got a litany of policies that would further damage industries that are struggling to survive,” he said.

Kenney also took aim at a Liberal pledge to turn 25 per cent of Canada’s land mass into protected areas.

The premier said such a “sterilizing” move would be “potentially devastating” on Alberta’s mining industry.

Kenney also blasted the speech over it’s clean fuel and other climate change promises and said Alberta “is doing everything humanly possible” to lower carbon emissions.

“If Alberta doesn’t produce these (energy) things they will be produced elsewhere,” he said.

Kenney said governments have to be able to “pivot” during hard times, just like the Stephen Harper government he was a part of did to save the Canadian auto industry.

“The government of Canada had the opportunity to pivot….they failed to pivot,” Kenney said.

Kenney said there were more policies invading provincial jurisdiction “than I could count.”

“It’s a full frontal attack on Canadian federalism,” he said.

“I see Alberta participating in many more constitutional challenges.”

Kenney once again pointed out Alberta has given the rest of the country more than $630 billion since 1960 in transfer payments to help build things like schools and hospitals across Canada.

“A strong Canada needs a strong Alberta,” he said.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Trudeau: Second wave is here but ‘we have a shot at Christmas’

When the lockdown began in Canada on March 13, there were 47 cases of COVID announced that day. On Tuesday, there were more than 1,000 new cases.

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The second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic is already sweeping the country, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in a nationally-televised address Wednesday night.

“We won’t be gathering for Thanksgiving but we still have a shot at Christmas,” Trudeau said in a speech that copied huge chunks out of his Throne Speech from earlier in the day.

Trudeau noted when the lockdown began in Canada on March 13, there were 47 cases of COVID announced that day. On Tuesday, there were more than 1,000 new cases.

More than 9,000 Canadians have been killed by the coronavirus.

“This is the fight of our generation,” said Trudeau.

“The fall could be worse than the spring.”

Trudeau urged Canadians to get their flu shots and follow health advice on gatherings and social distancing.

“This is not the time for parties – we can not let our guard down now,” he said.

“It is up to us to build the world of tomorrow.”

Trudeau urged Canadians to take care of elderly people during the pandemic.

And despite the pledge not to make the broadcast political, Trudeau launched into a litany of things the Liberals have introduced during the pandemic and his Throne Speech promises to set up a national day care program.

Trudeau called front line workers during the pandemic “heroes.”

“The are many days to go before we get to the other side of this… we are Canadians and there is nothing we can’t do,” said Trudeau.

Sen. Frum tweet

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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