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Nenshi calls for patio heaters for restaurants to beat winter blues

“I really am encouraging restaurants to get those (heat) lamps.”

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Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi says city restaurants struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic should turn up the heat on their patios and try to stay open into the winter.

“I really am encouraging restaurants to get those (heat) lamps, you know even — it sounds silly but it works in lots of cold weather places — put blankets on the tables and keep those patios open as far into the season as we can,” Nenshi told reporters this week.

“Even though restaurants are doing a terrific job of managing physical distancing by and large within the restaurant, as the weather gets colder there’s always a concern that more indoor gatherings will lead to more spread (of COVID-19).

As part of the battle to help businesses, the city passed a bylaw in May allowing restaurants to be able to expand onto the sidewalks in front of them.

“Once the weather does get colder and there’s snow on the ground, then I would really recommend people consider keeping indoor gatherings small and social distancing is part of the gathering,” said Chief Medical Officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw.

Calgary is expected to see some chillier weather next week with the mercury predicted to drop down to only 1C on Monday evening.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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Kenney’s anger at Throne Speech continues to grow

Kenney called the speech “kooky”, full of “bright shiny objects” and policy ideas that will see Alberta challenging them in the Supreme Court.

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After having a night to sleep on it, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney emerged Thursday no less angry about Justin Trudeau’s Throne Speech.

During a morning press conference, Kenney called the speech “kooky”, full of “bright shiny objects” and policy ideas that will see Alberta challenging them in the Supreme Court.

An angry Kenney said he will be talking to other premier’s later Thursday and they will issue a statement about the speech later Thursday or Friday.

The premier noted not a single word in the speech discussed the crippled oil and gas sectors in Alberta.

Nor was there any mention of the growing concern of Western Alienation.

“All premiers asked the government to focus on two things in the speech – health care and the economy,” Kenney told reporters.

“Instead we got bright shiny objects and kooky objectives.”

Kenney said he hoped the speech would offer something “to allow the energy industry that has been cut off at the knees to get back on their feet.

“Instead we got a litany of policies that would further damage industries that are struggling to survive,” he said.

Kenney also took aim at a Liberal pledge to turn 25 per cent of Canada’s land mass into protected areas.

The premier said such a “sterilizing” move would be “potentially devastating” on Alberta’s mining industry.

Kenney also blasted the speech over it’s clean fuel and other climate change promises and said Alberta “is doing everything humanly possible” to lower carbon emissions.

“If Alberta doesn’t produce these (energy) things they will be produced elsewhere,” he said.

Kenney said governments have to be able to “pivot” during hard times, just like the Stephen Harper government he was a part of did to save the Canadian auto industry.

“The government of Canada had the opportunity to pivot….they failed to pivot,” Kenney said.

Kenney said there were more policies invading provincial jurisdiction “than I could count.”

“It’s a full frontal attack on Canadian federalism,” he said.

“I see Alberta participating in many more constitutional challenges.”

Kenney once again pointed out Alberta has given the rest of the country more than $630 billion since 1960 in transfer payments to help build things like schools and hospitals across Canada.

“A strong Canada needs a strong Alberta,” he said.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Trudeau: Second wave is here but ‘we have a shot at Christmas’

When the lockdown began in Canada on March 13, there were 47 cases of COVID announced that day. On Tuesday, there were more than 1,000 new cases.

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The second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic is already sweeping the country, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in a nationally-televised address Wednesday night.

“We won’t be gathering for Thanksgiving but we still have a shot at Christmas,” Trudeau said in a speech that copied huge chunks out of his Throne Speech from earlier in the day.

Trudeau noted when the lockdown began in Canada on March 13, there were 47 cases of COVID announced that day. On Tuesday, there were more than 1,000 new cases.

More than 9,000 Canadians have been killed by the coronavirus.

“This is the fight of our generation,” said Trudeau.

“The fall could be worse than the spring.”

Trudeau urged Canadians to get their flu shots and follow health advice on gatherings and social distancing.

“This is not the time for parties – we can not let our guard down now,” he said.

“It is up to us to build the world of tomorrow.”

Trudeau urged Canadians to take care of elderly people during the pandemic.

And despite the pledge not to make the broadcast political, Trudeau launched into a litany of things the Liberals have introduced during the pandemic and his Throne Speech promises to set up a national day care program.

Trudeau called front line workers during the pandemic “heroes.”

“The are many days to go before we get to the other side of this… we are Canadians and there is nothing we can’t do,” said Trudeau.

Sen. Frum tweet

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Opposition parties blast Throne Speech – Tories say they will vote against it

We’ve looked at this Speech from the Throne and Conservatives cannot support it,” said Candice Bergen

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The Tories say they won’t support the Justin Trudeau Speech from the Throne.

And other opposition figures all said they were less than impressed with the 54-minute speech that was a laundry list of promises that will cost untold billions.

If enough opposition members amongst the Tories, Bloc, NDP and Greens don’t vote in favour of the speech, the government will fall and an election called.

Tory deputy leader Candice Bergen said her party won’t support the speech.

“We’ve looked at this Speech from the Throne and Conservatives cannot support it,” she said.

“It doesn’t speak at all of national unity, it doesn’t speak of our energy sector and our workers in Alberta and Saskatchewan and Manitoba. It doesn’t talk about agriculture.”

The speech left Alberta Premier Jason Kenney fuming.

“Alberta is disappointed that instead of listening to Canada’s provinces, the federal government doubled down on policies that will kill jobs, make Canada poorer and weaken national unity,” Kenney said in a statement.

“Last week, I was joined by Premiers Ford, Legault and Pallister in Ottawa to speak on behalf of Canada’s provinces. We made it clear that the provinces are united in their priorities: healthcare and the economy. The speech we heard today was anything but.

“I want to be clear: it’s not just Alberta’s energy sector that needs Canada right now. For a real recovery, Canada needs Alberta’s energy. Albertans have made a net contribution of more than $600 billion through transfers to the rest of Canada to build roads, schools, hospitals and the critical infrastructure Canadians need, in large part due to Alberta’s energy industry. And even conservative estimates from experts and economists show the global demand for oil increasing over the next 20 years.”

Michael Cooper, Tory MP for St. Albert-Edmonton said the speech lacked help for the West.

“Throne Speech has 6783 words & not one mention of “pipelines”, “oil” or “gas” or any plan to speed up billions of job-creating energy projects awaiting federal approval. Justin Trudeau’s vision leaves Alberta behind,” he tweeted.

Tory finance critic Pierre Poilievre was also unimpressed.

“The truest statement in the Throne Speech was this one: “We owe an immense debt…” he tweeted.

The NDP also expressed their displeasure.

“Today, the government’s throne speech was full of promises we’ve heard before A throne speech is just words on paper & this PM has shown us that his actions don’t match his empty words It doesn’t need to be this way,” tweeted leader Jagmeet Singh.

Tory leader Erin O’Toole and Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet both missed the speech because they are suffering from coronavirus.

“Disappointing speech from the throne for Quebec. Does not respect the jurisdiction of the provinces in health. I will discuss it tomorrow with the premiers of the other provinces,” tweeted Quebec Premier Francois Legault.

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister reaction

People’s Party of Canada head Maxime Bernier tweeted: “My predictions for today’s Throne speech: More programs we can’t afford More massive deficit spending More intrusions into provincial jurisdictions More pandering to special interests More COVID-19 and climate alarmism to justify it all”

In a strange reaction, former Green Party leader Elizabeth May said they could still hold the balance of power.

Scott moe tweet

“If a whole bunch of MPs on their way to parliament fell down and something heavy landed on them at that point we could be absolutely critical to the survival this of this government,” she told reporters.

The Canadian Taxpayers Federation expressed deep concern about the agenda proposed by the Trudeau government.

May statement

“The deficit is closing in on $400 billion and there was zero mention of any plan to hit the brakes on spending,” said CTF Federal Director Aaron Wudrick.

“We can’t carry on like this for much longer, and yet the Trudeau government seems to meet this deteriorating fiscal situation with a shrug.”

The federal debt is on track to reach $1 trillion before the end of the year, with more debt incurred in this fiscal year than in the previous 22 years.

…more to come

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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