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UCP bans police carding in Alberta; new rules for street checks

Madu said banning the practice of police officers randomly stopping people and demanding ID is a “real solution” for police to be able to help build a bridge of trust with minorities.

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Alberta Justice Minister Kaycee Madu has banned police carding in the province.

Madu said banning the practice of police officers randomly stopping people and demanding ID is a “real solution” for police to be able to help build a bridge of trust with minorities.

Madu also introduced new rules regarding police street checks. Police services will now have to file quarterly and annual reports to the government on information gleaned in the checks.

“We need to address racism right now,” said Madu at a Thursday press conference

“I do believe the answer we are looking for does not come from defunding the police. That is pandering to a far-left ideology being presented by radicals.”

Madu said carding has been “misused” in the past causing legitimate concerns in racialized communities.

“Carding has been an inappropriate use of police power,” he said.

UCP Chief Government Whip and Calgary MLA Mike Ellis has been pushing for the ban since he joined politics from the Calgary Police Service.

He said while in opposition he received pushback on the idea from the ruling NDP and police forces in Edmonton and Lethbridge.

Minority group representitives at Thursday’s press conference praised Madu for the change.

“Today’s announcement is a significant step in the right direction to build trust between the Black community and police services.” said Kemoh Mansaray, board chair, Africa Centre.

“It is great to see the Alberta government’s commitment to true reconciliation. Banning carding and establishing clear rules for common interactions between police and the public will ensure the rights of all Albertans are protected. We’ve been asking for these changes for years and want to acknowledge this government’s leadership by standing with us against racism,” said Chief Ouray Crowfoot, Siksika Nation.

Joining the praise was Edmonton Police Service Chief Dale McPhee who thanked Madu for his “quick action.”

“The Alberta Association of Chiefs of Police is in full support of the province’s guidelines on street checks. While the practice of carding has no place in policing, street checks are a valuable investigative tool that allow police officers to develop street-level intelligence while balancing the rights of all Albertans. It is important that every member of the public is treated with respect and in a fair manner, and we believe that setting these standards across the province will achieve this while strengthening relationships with the communities we serve,” said McFee who is also president of Alberta Association of Chiefs of Police.

CPS Chief Mark Neufeld said talks about carding and street checks have been ongoing since 2016.

He said the CPS conducts about one street check per hour – with most of them happening because of calls for service from the public.

“We are pleased the provincial government has recognized the importance of the street check process and the role it plays in public safety. The Calgary Police Service policy and procedures around street checks are currently well aligned with the direction contained in what we have seen of the new policing standards. We will continue to work with the province on the implementation of these new standards, as well as with our communities, to ensure greater understanding and confidence in this practice.”

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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Majority of Canadians want Terry Fox to be the face of new $5 bill

Past Tory voters overwhelming pick Fox

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The vast majority of Canadians want Terry Fox to adorn the new $5 bill, a new poll finds.

The non-profit Angus Reid Institute found that among the eight final candidates, Terry Fox is named more than all others as the preferred new face, chosen by 57 per cent of Canadians.

Angus Reid poll

After losing part of his right leg to cancer, Terry Fox campaigned to raise national awareness and funding for cancer research by running his Marathon of Hope, a cross-Canada 42-km daily run, on his prosthetic leg.

By February 1981, $24.7 million had been raised—or $1 for every Canadian.

His run was interrupted just past the half-way point when the cancer reached his lungs, and ultimately took his life.

Today, annual Terry Fox Runs are held all over the world to raise money for cancer research. In 2020, the Marathon of Hope marked its 40th anniversary.

“Famed Indigenous soldier Binaaswi (Francis Pegahmagabow) is chosen by one-in-five (21 per cent), including one-quarter of residents in Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Atlantic Canada. Crowfoot (Isapo-muxika), an integral part of Treaty 7 negotiations in Alberta, is chosen by one-in-five (19 per cent) as well,” Angus Reid pollsters found.

“Past Conservative voters are much more likely to prefer Terry Fox as their choice (three-quarters do so), while those who support other parties like candidates other than him.

Angus Reid poll

“Residents in Quebec (34 per cent) and young women across the country (27 per cent) show considerable support for Robertine Barry, the first French-Canadian journalist and an advocate for women’s rights, as a candidate.”

Angus Reid poll

More than three-in-five overall, and a majority in each region of the country, say it is a good idea to change the face of the five. But a significant segment, 37 per cent (including 57 per cent of past Conservative voters), disagree.

Sir Wilfred Laurier, Canada’s seventh prime minister, has graced the nation’s sky blue five-dollar bank note for almost 50 years.

Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland is to make a decision early next year about who should adorn the new bill.

Bios on all the finalists can be found here.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Legal fund for arrested restaurant owner Skelly hits $150,000

He’s set to appear in court later Friday to face charges of attempt to obstruct police, mischief under, failure to comply with Reopening Act.

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Legal funds raised for a Toronto-area man arrested after he refused to close his BBQ joint have already topped $150,000.

A crowd of supporters chanted “Shame” as police took Adam Skelly, 33, away on Thursday afternoon.

Skelly being arrested

He’s set to appear in court later Friday to face charges of attempt to obstruct police, mischief under, failure to comply with Reopening Act.

GoFundMe campaign online boasts at least 3,200 people donating over $150,000 for the owner of Adamson Barbecue

More than 10 police cars as many as 18 officers came to the restaurant after a Wednesday raid saw them change the locks and bolt it shut.

Before being arrested, Skelly vowed to remain open.

“The break-in of #adamsonbarbecue by Toronto Police and the city is tyrannical. They CANNOT silence us!” he tweeted Thursday.

He also issued a call for a locksmith to come and help him get into his place in Etobicoke.

“This isn’t just about #adamsonbarbecue. it’s about all small businesses and their livelihoods. spread the word and let’s get back to work. thank you. #IStandWithAdam” he tweeted.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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CTF blasts Horgan for increasing size of B.C. cabinet

“It’s disappointing to see the premier had a chance to show leadership by trimming cabinet and saving taxpayers money, but instead he made cabinet even bigger.”

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The Canadian Taxpayers Federation is slamming Premier John Horgan’s move to increase the size of his cabinet while provincial residents tighten their belts.

“It’s disappointing to see the premier had a chance to show leadership by trimming cabinet and saving taxpayers money, but instead he made cabinet even bigger,” said Kris Sims, B.C. Director for the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, in a statement.

“Many people have lost their jobs, lost their businesses or had their salaries reduced, so when the premier adds more ministers and expense it shows we are certainly not all in this together.” 

Before the election, the province had 22 cabinet ministers and eight parliamentary secretaries. 

After Thursday’s swearing-in ceremony, there are now 24 cabinet ministers and 13 parliamentary secretaries.

B.C. cabinet ministers are currently paid a salary of more than $166,000, plus living allowances.

“If Horgan had cut the size and cost of his government, he would have shown solidarity with struggling taxpayers and he could have inspired similar moves from politicians across the country,” said Sims. 

Cabinet ministers in British Columbia who are in office for more than six years are eligible for very generous pensions at age 65, with many collecting more than $70,000 per year upon retirement.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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