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Manitoba senator teams up with Jane Goodall in bill to help Canada’s zoo animals

Sinclair called Goodall “a hero to animals and animal-rights advocates, to the environment and to my grandchildren”

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A Manitoba senator is teaming up with the world’s most prominent expert on primates to introduce a bill to protect captive animals and ban imports of elephant ivory and hunting trophies into Canada.

“I’m introducing a bill in the Senate of Canada that will establish some of the strongest animal-protection laws in the world,” Sen. Murray Sinclair told reporters Tuesday in Ottawa.

“Certainly, the strongest animal-protection laws in Canada.”

Sinclair is naming his bill the Jane Goodall Act, after the primatologist who has worked for 60 years studying social and family interactions among wild chimpanzees.

Sinclair’s bill would ban new captivity of great apes and elephants unless it’s licensed and for their best interests.

It would also ban elephants and great apes from performing in circuses.

The act would establish legal standing for the protected animals allowing courts to issue orders to move them to new care or to improve their living conditions.

There are believed to be 20 elephants and 33 great apes living in captivity in Canada including nine chimpanzees, 18 gorillas and six orangutans, The Canadian Press reported.

Sinclair called Goodall “a hero to animals and animal-rights advocates, to the environment and to my grandchildren”

At the press conference, Goodall said: “Some people torture animals. It’s because they don’t understand. Other people deliberately choose not to understand how (animals) feel pain and fear and distress. A lot of education is needed.”

“It would be just wonderful if this bill is passed, so that Canada can prove that it is on the forefront of humane treatment of animals.”

Sinclair said the bill is not aimed at causing trouble for zoos.

“Zoos are potential partners in establishing legal protections for captive animals,” he said.

“I like to point out that Toronto Zoo and the Calgary Zoo have taken steps already to protect these animals and ensure that they are not maintained in captivity in Canada any longer.”

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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CTF demands Horgan reduce size of B.C. cabinet

The CTF said there are currently 22 cabinet ministers and eight parliamentary secretaries in the B.C. cabinet.

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The Canadian Taxpayers Federation says NDP Premier John Horgan should reduce the size of his new cabinet to save money and to keep in step with everyday British Columbians.

“Many hardworking British Columbians have had their salaries reduced or they’ve lost their jobs during the COVID-19 economic crisis and it would be a good move for Premier Horgan to form a cabinet that is 15 per cent smaller than his last one,” said Kris Sims, B.C. Director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation in a statement.

“By reducing the size of his new cabinet and reducing their salaries, the premier will save taxpayers’ money and show that we are all in this together.”

The CTF said there are currently 22 cabinet ministers and eight parliamentary secretaries in the B.C. cabinet. Reducing the number by 15 per cent would keep the number to 19 cabinet ministers and seven parliamentary secretaries.

B.C. cabinet ministers are currently paid a salary of more than $166,000 plus living allowances, and if they reduced their salaries by 15 per cent it would bring the remuneration down to $141,000 plus living expenses.

“Reducing the size and cost of government would show solidarity with struggling taxpayers and help this government to understand what average people are going through,” said Sims. 

Cabinet ministers in B.C. who are in office for more than six years are in line for very generous pensions when they reach the age of 65, with many typically being paid more than $70,000 per year upon retirement.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Bloc demands no more concessions on dairy deals

Canada’s dairy farms are under strict government controls on what they can produce.

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The Bloc Quebecois has introduced a motion to stop for federal Liberals from making any more trade deals that allow greater access to the countries dairy system.

Canada’s dairy farms are under strict government controls on what they can produce.

The amount of foreign access to the market has also been tightly regulated but the Liberals last three trade deals allow foreign countries greater access into the market, said the Bloc.

“Something very important for milk and egg and poultry production is given away as a token and nothing comes back for those producers, so we say in the law that this should not happen anymore,” Bloc Leader Yves-François Blanchet told CBC News.

“[The Liberal government says,] ‘Oh, we will will compensate you. And you know what, they don’t.”

The CBC reported Bloc Québécois MP Louis Plamondon’s legislation, Bill C-216, would amend the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act to state that the minister “must not make any commitment … by future trade treaty or agreement” that would increase the tariff rate quota (TRQ) applicable to dairy products, poultry or eggs, or reduce the tariff applicable to those goods when they are imported in excess of that quota.

The private member’s bill is up for its debate on Tuesday.

Blanchet slammed Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland for delaying her fall economic update and said her spending plans must include the new NAFTA deal compensation farmers are waiting for.

“This money is owed, is expected [and] is terribly late,” he told CBC.

The economic statement is set for Nov. 30.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Manitoba RCMP fine church minister after religious service drew 100 people

“To be honest, I feel honoured to get these and that I received them for doing something that God wants me to do,” the minister said in an interview

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RCMP in Manitoba have been called in to investigate after a rural church in Manitoba broke COVID-19 regulations and hosted a service for more than 100 people – and have laid levied fines against the minister.

Current laws dictate gatherings in Manitoba are limited to a maximum of five people and churches must be closed in an effort to stop the growing number of coronavirus cases in the province.

Religious leaders must hold services via the internet.

The church minister has now been slapped with two fines totalling nearly $2,600 for attending a protest against COVID-19 restrictions and being at a Sunday religious service.

Tobias Tissen, minister at Church of God, confirmed he received two individual fines of $1,296 Monday night.

“To be honest, I feel honoured to get these and that I received them for doing something that God wants me to do,” he said in an interview with CBC News.

Mounties were called to the Church of God in Hanover, southeast of Winnipeg, about 8:30 a.m. on Sunday about multiple vehicles in the parking lot and a gathering inside.

“It is believed there were well over 100 people inside the church, and the officers had to balance police and public safety when determining a response,” said RCMP spokesperson Julie Courchaine in an email to the CBC.

“This is currently still under investigation and RCMP are working closely with Manitoba Public Health on the matter.”

Dr. Brent Roussin, Manitoba’s chief provincial public health officer, said he is aware of the reports of ongoing church services and urged them to stop.

“It should be quite clear, these orders are not here to restrict your right to worship. These orders are here to save lives,” CBC reported Roussin said.

“We can’t have in-person gatherings. Not with the positivity rates we’re seeing. It puts Manitobans at risk.”

The fine for individuals breaching the orders is $1,296 while corporations can be penalized with a $5,000 ticket.

Manitoba has had more than 14,000 coronavirus cases resulting in 236 deaths.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

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